. . Support our Sponsor

. . Flags of the World Maps of All Countries
geographic.org Home Page Countries Index

Philippines Uniforms, Ranks, and Insignia
http://www.photius.com/countries/philippines/national_security/philippines_national_security_uniforms_ranks_and~884.html
Sources: The Library of Congress Country Studies; CIA World Factbook
    << Back to Philippines National Security

    [PDF]

    Figure 11. Officer Ranks and Insignia, 1989

    Source: Based on information from United States, Allied Army Training Study of the Republic of the Philippines, Fort Monroe, Virginia, 1989, 60.

    [PDF]

    Figure 12. Enlisted Ranks and Insignia, 1989

    Source: Based on information from United States, Allied Army Training Study of the Republic of the Philippines, Fort Monroe, Virginia, 1989, 60.

    The rank structure of the armed forces in the early 1990s was very similar to that of counterpart services in the United States (see fig. 11). There were, however, no warrant officer ranks in any of the four armed forces, and all four services maintained seven enlisted grades rather than nine as in the United States system (see fig. 12). The army, air force, and constabulary used the same ranks and insignia. Officer ranks corresponded to their United States counterparts, except that naval flag officers were called commodores and admirals but were equivalent to United States Navy rear admirals. The single full general in the nation in 1990 was a constabulary officer who had received his fourth star by virtue of his position as the AFP chief of staff. Likewise, the AFP vice chief of staff was the only lieutenant general, and the four service chiefs were major generals. The military had some 100 general officers. AFP uniforms reflected the military's close ties to the United States and the Philippines' hot, humid climate. Field uniforms for all services were a mixture of American-style olive-drab and camouflage jungle fatigues. Because of chronic uniform shortages, military personnel often wore civilian clothes, making armed soldiers difficult to distinguish from militia, insurgents, vigilantes, or members of private security forces. Dress uniforms were similar to those worn by United States forces, made of summer-weight tan or white fabric.

    Data as of June 1991


    NOTE: The information regarding Philippines on this page is re-published from The Library of Congress Country Studies and the CIA World Factbook. No claims are made regarding the accuracy of Philippines Uniforms, Ranks, and Insignia information contained here. All suggestions for corrections of any errors about Philippines Uniforms, Ranks, and Insignia should be addressed to the Library of Congress and the CIA.

Support Our Sponsor

Support Our Sponsor

Please put this page in your BOOKMARKS - - - - -



http://www.photius.com/countries/philippines/national_security/philippines_national_security_uniforms_ranks_and~884.html

Revised 10-Nov-04
Copyright © 2004 Photius Coutsoukis (all rights reserved)


ctr040601